As American As Blueberry Pie.

Blueberry-Galette
It is red white and blueberry time as we have the perfect dessert that is easy to make for your Labor day family feast. It is time for a Blueberry Cheesecake Galette.
A Galette is a term used in French cuisine to designate various types of flat round or freeform crusty cakes, or, in the case of a Breton galette, a pancake made with buckwheat flour usually with a savory filling.
Blueberry pie or in this case Calette is considered one of the easiest pies to make because it does not require pitting or peeling of fruit. It usually has a top and bottom crust.
The top crust can be a circular crust but the pie can also have a crumble crust or no top crust at all. Blueberry pies are often eaten in the summertime because that is when blueberries are in season.
Blueberry pie was first eaten by early American settlers and remains a popular dessert in the United States and Canada.
Similar desserts are prepared in Europe with bilberries. Blueberry pie made with wild Maine blueberries is the official state dessert of the U.S. state of Maine.

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” William Shakespeare once said. If that’s true, would the same logic work for a delicious fruit filled pie if it were called a grunt, a crow’s nest pudding, a buckle or a slump?

The pie, or “pye,” has been around since 2nd century B.C., when a Roman housewife came up with the idea of sealing meat inside a flour and oil paste and baked it. The concept of the pie expanded through the centuries to include fruit. Early settlers of America, eager to use their favorite recipes from home, were masters at improvising when they couldn’t find ingredients, even using primitive equipment on open hearths. Steamed bread pudding, for example, became a baked Apple Brown Betty. Early colonists were so fond of these juicy dishes that they often served them as the main course, for breakfast, or even as a first course. It wasn’t until the late 19th century that fruit laden pie-like dishes became primarily desserts.

The concept of the pie expanded through the centuries to include fruit. Early settlers of America, eager to use their favorite recipes from home, were masters at improvising when they couldn’t find ingredients, even using primitive equipment on open hearths. Steamed bread pudding, for example, became a baked Apple Brown Betty. Early colonists were so fond of these juicy dishes that they often served them as the main course, for breakfast, or even as a first course. It wasn’t until the late 19th century that fruit laden pie-like dishes became primarily desserts.

Steamed bread pudding, for example, became a baked Apple Brown Betty. Early colonists were so fond of these juicy dishes that they often served them as the main course, for breakfast, or even as a first course. It wasn’t until the late 19th century that fruit laden pie-like dishes became primarily desserts.

Today, adaptations of the pie have emerged from regions: crumble, cobbler, crisp, Brown Betty, tart, torte, pandowdy, grunt, slump, buckles, croustade, bird’s nest pudding. The origin of the names is based, more or less, on the placement of the dough. In New England, fruit cobbler is baked in a baking dish or frying pan, with several lumps of biscuit or scone dough dropped on top. Other regions place the dough on the bottom and cover it with fruit. Wherever the dough happens to be place, these pie-like desserts are based on whatever fresh ingredients are in your kitchen, ready to be used. They’re meant to be humble and homemade, relying more on taste than fancy pastry preparation. My kind of pie!

They’re meant to be humble and homemade, relying more on taste than fancy pastry preparation. My kind of pie!

Crisps, crumbles and their pie-ish cousins have the comforting taste of a made-from-scratch dessert, filled with seasonal fruit and berries, finished off with a golden-brown topping. Best of all, they don’t take much prep work. The magic happens in the oven while you tend to more pressing matters, like enjoying a lovely summer evening.

How to tell a crisp from a crumble and a slump from a sonker:

Cobbler – An American deep-dish fruit dessert or pie with a thick biscuit and a fruit filling such as peaches, apples, berries. Some versions are enclosed in the crust, while others have a drop-biscuit or crumb topping.

Crisps and Crumbles – A bottom layer of fruit (or a mixture of fruits) baked with a crumb topping. Crumb topping can be made with flour, butter, nuts, oats, cookie or graham cracker crumbs.

Betty or Brown Betty– Consists of a fruit, most commonly apples, baked between layers of buttered crumbs. Betty was a popular baked pudding made during colonial times in America.

Grunts or Slump – An adaptation of the English steamed pudding that used fruit and dumplings. Massachusetts’ colonists called it a “grunt” because that was the sound the berries made as they stewed on the top of a stove. In Vermont, Maine, and Rhode Island, the dessert is called a slump.

Buckle or Crumble– A type of cake made in a single layer with blueberries added to the batter. The topping is similar to a streusel, which gives it a buckled or crumpled appearance.

Pandowdy– A deep-dish dessert most commonly made with apples sweetened with molasses or brown sugar. Topping is a crumbly type of biscuit. The crust is broken up during baking and pushed down into the fruit to allow the juices to come through. Exact origin of the name Pandowdy is unknown but is thought to refer to the dessert’s dowdy appearance.

Bird’s Nest Pudding or Crow’s Nest Pudding – Apples whose cores have been replaced by sugar. The apples are nestled in a bowl created by the crust.

Sonker – A Southern deep-dish pie or cobbler served in many flavors including strawberry, peach, sweet potato, and cherry.

Here’s a favorite family recipe of mine, shared by my aunt who lives in Pennsylvania:

Aunt Nancy’s Blueberry Buckle

Photo by Jeff Kubina
Labor day desserts should be almost labor free and not labor intensive. So grab your mixing bowl and wonder whisk. It is galette time.
Total Time: 2 hr 45 min
Prep: 2 hr 20 min
Cook: 25 minYield: 6 to 8 servingsLevel: IntermediateIngredientsFor the dough:
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
Pinch of kosher salt
1 stick cold unsalted butter, diced
1 large egg
Cooking spray
For the filling:
2 cups blueberries
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
4 teaspoons cornstarch
Pinch of kosher salt
1 8 -ounce package cream cheese
1 large egg, beaten, plus 1 egg yolk
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
Coarse sugar, for sprinkling

Blueberry Cheesecake Galette.7Directions

Make the dough: Pulse the flour, granulated sugar, vinegar and salt in a food processor until combined. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture looks like coarse meal with pea-size pieces of butter. Whisk the egg with 2 tablespoons water; add to the food processor and pulse until a dough just starts to form. Turn out onto a piece of plastic wrap; shape into a disk, wrap tightly and refrigerate until firm, at least 1 hour.

Mist a baking sheet with cooking spray. Roll out the dough into a 12-inch round between 2 sheets of floured parchment paper. Remove the top piece of parchment and invert the dough onto the prepared baking sheet; remove the other piece of parchment. Refrigerate until ready to assemble.

Make the filling: Toss the blueberries, 1/3 cup granulated sugar, the lemon juice, cornstarch and salt in a bowl. Whisk the cream cheese, egg yolk, the remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar and the nutmeg in a separate bowl.

Spread half of the cream cheese mixture over the dough, leaving a 2-inch border. Top with the blueberries. Fold the edge of the dough over the filling. Drizzle the remaining cream cheese mixture over the berries; refrigerate 30 minutes.

Put an inverted baking sheet in the lower third of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees F. Brush the crust with the beaten egg and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Put the baking sheet with the galette directly on the hot baking sheet in the oven. Bake until the crust is golden, 20 to 25 minutes.

Let cool slightly before slicing.

Add a scoop of Icecream (yum) to send you right to the unused treadmill. It is so worth it.

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